Alanine - Beta Alanine and Aminotransferase

   

AlanineAlanine is a non-essential amino acid that the body manufactures in the liver. Alanine is required for the metabolism of glucose and tryptophan and beta-alanine is a constituent of vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) as well as coenzyme A. It has also demonstrated a cholesterol-reducing effect in rats.

Alanine is a crystalline form of amino acid which is hydrophobic with a methyl group side chain. Deficiency of Alanine is unlikely to occur since it it produced in the body itself and is also present in many different foods.


Alanine is a major component of connective tissue. It is the key intermediate in the glucose alanine cycle, which allows muscles and other tissues to derive energy from amino acids. Alanine helps build up the immune system.

Alanine

Molecular Weight - 89.09

Occurence - 7.49 %

Alanine Food Sources

Meat and poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products are high in alanine amino acid.

Alanine Deficiency Symptoms

Since alanine is synthesized in the body and is also provided by most foods that are sources of protein, deficiencies are unlikely to occur.








 

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